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Science Alert. Trends in Applied Sciences Research. Year: Volume: 9 Issue: 4 Page No. Akpor , U.

Okolomike , T. Olaolu and B. Abstract: The onset of the industrial revolution has led to a surge in the quantity of hazardous compounds that are released into the environment.

These hazardous pollutants consist of a variety of hydrocarbons and other organic compounds that pose serious risks to humans, animals and the environment. The presence of hydrocarbons in wastewater effluents is due to a variety of sources, which include oil spill age, pesticides, urban storm water discharges and automobile oil. The removal of hydrocarbons from wastewater before discharge into receiving water bodies from wastewater effluents entails a variety of processes, with the most common processes being phytoremediation, bioremediation and chemical remediation.

Phytoremediation is a cost effective method of reducing risk to human and ecosystem health posed by contaminated water. The effluent was collected from the outlet of the furnace of a Steel Foundry located in Hayatabad Industrial Estate, Peshawar, in clean plastic cans. The cans were properly washed with detergent and distilled water prior to water collection and were carefully rinsed with sample effluent, filled up to the brim and tightly closed to ensure bubble-free sample storage Hussain, Young plants were selected for the experiment.

These plants were brought to the laboratory, carefully washed to remove dust and other organic matter. The effluent was used in raw form as collected from the sampling site. Three replicates for each treatment with a total 3 observations were performed. Test plants were harvested after 10, 20 and 30 days, respectively, from the day of commencement of the experiment. The plants were weighed after each observation to determine the increase in the weight of the plants. There was a control set of treatment tap water for both the test plants.

International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology

The treated water from the replicates during each observation was stored in clean, dry glass bottles and was immediately carried to the laboratory for characterization of physical parameters, including pH, temperature, total dissolved solids, and electrical conductance. The pH was measured by using a glass electrode pH meter, while temperature, total dissolved solids, and electrical conductance of the control and steel effluent before and after treatment were measured by using a conductivity meter, model Thermonion. Chemical parameters, i. Analysis of Heavy Metals in Tested Plants. The heavy metals concentration in all the tested plants and control were detected with an Atomic Absorption Spectrometer.

The plant samples were prepared by drying, grinding, dry ashing and wet ashing. Grinding was done in a pestle and mortar. This powder material was preserved in plastic bags. The ash produced was then packed in sealed plastic bags. Wet ashing was done by following the standard procedure adopted by Haynes The prepared solution was filtered and stored in clean, labeled plastic bottles until sent for analysis by the Central Resource Laboratory University of Peshawar.

Statistical Analysis. All the results were the mean of three readings and the standard deviation was calculated for metal uptake by plants in their different parts like roots and shoots. Control and Steel Effluent. The initial values of the physical parameters of the control and steel effluent prior to and after treatment with test plants are presented in Table 1.


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The changes in initial weight and also no. The initial weight of P.

Odjegba and Fasidi also revealed the accumulation capacity and resistance of P. Phytoaccumulation of Heavy Metals in Test Plants. Results for the accumulation of metals in different plant parts and on the whole are summarized in Table 3 , Figures 1 and 2. Al was accumulated in highest concentration, The shoots of E. Deposition of As was in the range of 0. The shoots of the test plants stored 0. In the same way, these plants accumulated 0. Cr was deposited in P. Similarly, 1.

Environmental Science and Engineering Volume 11 : Soil Pollution and Phytoremediation

These results are in accordance with Prajapati et al. Retention of Cr was more in roots as compared with shoots, confirming the findings of Rehman and Haesgawa who found that arsenic translocation in P. Earlier findings have also revealed that arsenic compounds are less readily translocated through the root system of aquatic plants. Of the total concentration, 0. The concentration of Fe in P. The shoots of the test plants showed 4. The roots of P. The phytoaccumulation capacities of P.

The shoots of P. The concentration of Pb in P. The results for percentage efficiency indicated that E. Odjegba and Fasidi also revealed the accumulation capacity and resistance of P. Phytoaccumulation of Heavy Metals in Test Plants. Results for the accumulation of metals in different plant parts and on the whole are summarized in Table 3 , Figures 1 and 2.

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Al was accumulated in highest concentration, The shoots of E. Deposition of As was in the range of 0. The shoots of the test plants stored 0. In the same way, these plants accumulated 0. Cr was deposited in P. Similarly, 1. These results are in accordance with Prajapati et al. Retention of Cr was more in roots as compared with shoots, confirming the findings of Rehman and Haesgawa who found that arsenic translocation in P.

Earlier findings have also revealed that arsenic compounds are less readily translocated through the root system of aquatic plants. Of the total concentration, 0. The concentration of Fe in P. The shoots of the test plants showed 4. The roots of P. The phytoaccumulation capacities of P.

The shoots of P. The concentration of Pb in P. The results for percentage efficiency indicated that E. These results are in accordance with Zhu et al. This may be due to its well-developed fibrous root system and large biomass that has been successfully used in wastewater treatment systems to improve water quality by reducing the levels of organic and inorganic nutrients. Pistia stratiotes was helpful in the removal of some heavy metals from the industrial effluent and was found to be the best phytoremedient for Pb, Cu as it was successful in removing Similar findings were also reported by Lu while working on lettuce that was a hyper accumulator of Fe, Pb and Cu.

The same kind of findings were also reported by Mokhtar et al. Results of the present study supported the previous findings that aquatic plants can be used efficiently in phytoremediation technology. Tested plants were found to be efficient phytoremediators and can be used to treat industrial effluents, although E. Abou-Shanab, R. International Journal of Phytoremediation, 9, Andleeb, S. International Journal of Agricultural Biology, 12, Begum, A. International Journal of Chemical Technology Research, 2, Chua, H. In Guangdong Province of China.

Science and Environment, , Dhote, S. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, , Ebel, M. Chemosphere, 66, Ghosh, M. Applied Ecology and Environmental Rsearch, 3, Haynes, R. Communications in Plant Science and Soil Analysis, 11, Hussain, F. National Academy of Higher Education.